comedycentral:

Click here for more of Jon Stewart’s coverage of the recent House Committee on Science, Space and Technology hearing.

bidyke:

9 TV shows with bi characters

It’s Bi Visibility week, and bitalks have asked everyone to blog about bi representation in the media! Hooray! In honor of the occasion, here’s a this list of 9 TV shows that have bi characters in them.

Disclaimer: I define bi characters in the broadest way possible, as characters who have canonically displayed or mentioned sexual and/or romantic attraction towards people of more than one gender, no matter how seemingly-miniscule, or how “unbalanced”. Possibly not everyone will agree with me about everyone’s bisexuality. Please remember: Bisexuals are scavengers. We take whatever scraps the world leaves us with and we make whatever we can of them. We have to interpret these characters as bisexual because if we didn’t, we’d have almost nothing left.

Also remember: if a character who displays this sort of attraction does not identify as bisexual, this is not something that needs to be “respected”. Fictional characters are not people, they are texts. They are not real. Their identity is not a “personal choice” because it’s made up. What they are is: a. A reflection of hegemonic attitudes around bisexuality; and - b. Open to interpretation.

More disclaimer: ALL THESE REPRESENTATIONS ARE PROBLEMATIC. Again, we have to make do with what we have. The very fact that bisexuality is present is already way more than what we usually get!

In the order of the pictures above (top to bottom, left to right), and no particular hierarchical order:

(Links lead to IMDB)

1. Penny Dreadful

  • I am IN LOVE with this series!!!!!!11111
  • Dorian Gray
  • Ethan Chandler
  • Victor Frankenstein is ace and bi
  • Definite bi overtones in Vanessa and Mina’s dynamic

2. Doctor Who

  • Captain Jack Harkness
  • The Doctor
  • River Song
  • Amy Pond
  • Clara

3. Lost Girl

  • I haven’t seen the entire show yet so all I know is -
  • Bo

4. Game of Thrones

5. True Blood

  • Eric
  • Pam
  • Jason
  • Tara
  • Steve Newlin
  • Sarah Newlin
  • Maryann Forrester
  • Violet
  • Daphne Landry
  • Queen Sophie-Anne
  • James
  • There are way more but I forgot their names

6. Rose by Any Other Name

  • This show was actually created by a bi person - bi director, producer and activist Kyle Schickner!
  • Don’t be fooled by the low IMDB rating, it is in fact quite good.
  • It used to be for free on YouTube, but I can’t find it now :(
  • It is about the bisexuality of the main character, Rose
  • I think the second season has more bi characters, but I haven’t watched it

7. Orange is the New Black

  • I hate this show
  • Piper
  • Morello
  • And possibly a few more in the second season?… I haven’t been watching it.

8. Torchwood

  • This show is a Doctor Who spinoff
  • Captain Jack Harkness
  • Ianto
  • Gwen
  • Owen
  • Toshiko

9. Orphan Black

(via hollywoodisgay)

Anonymous said: Why do Starbucks employees insist on asking for the customer's name, which they always misspell, yet most of the time get the order wrong?

yourbaristahatesyou:

Do you feel that? That gnawing sense of curiosity… that’s been planted there, inception-style by your barista. It’s going to eat at you. It will slowly drive you mad until one day, you sit bolt-upright out of a dead sleep, drenched in a sweat that can only come from the sheer panic that would ensue by realizing that….

We don’t give two fucking shits about whether or not your name gets spelled correctly so you can instagram your fucking drink.

musaafer:

So as I mentioned, I’m profoundly bored with these messages but I figured some tips on how to dismantle this rhetoric may be helpful so here it goes 
First message: 
"Muslims invaded present day X and did Y" is a common talking point, possibly inspired by the white guilt that comes with the more recent and more lastingly affecting reality of colonialism. Yes. Empires did the thing where they spread. They continue to do so today (ahem, "US invaded present day Afghanistan and destroyed local places of worship, etc etc etc etc." is still true like, today). 
The world as we know it has been influenced heavily by the flows of these empires and conquest - is by that logic everything invalid? The Crusades were also a thing, is Christianity therefore invalid? 
Notice the places they are listing. 9 times out of 10 the person arguing this is not someone from those places but some random white dude from Kentucky. What I’m getting at is these people can barely locate these places on the map, let alone care about the sociopolitic histories and societal intricacies any other day of the year but when it comes to dismantling Islam, selective historic moments are handy to these people. Like, Afghanistan has been at far for 30+ years, Pakistan is at the brink of possibly falling into its fourth military dictatorship in its less than 70 years in existence and the spread of Islam 700 years ago is the problem? Get real. 
The term “natives” is incredibly derogatory and offensive and historically charged, akin to saying something like “colored people” instead of people of color. Deadass indicator the person isn’t about people’s actual experiences if they can’t even identifying them without falling over themselves with offensive language. 
Notice that I’m Afghan. And this person is not. Yet the conquest of my people - as a consequence of which I’m Muslim today, the consequences of which I am living with - is somehow of more concern to this person than it is to me? Keep in mind power dynamics. Keep in mind how your experience will be made into just another talking point in a conversation entirely designed to invalidate your experience and existence. 
The ever returning talking point on taxes on non-Muslims: What in the Lord’s name do you think Muslims were paying? Nothing? Do you think these Empires could expand with only ~taxes on da non-muzlims~? Non-Muslims paid Jizyah, Muslims paid Zakah. Don’t get smart with me by googling the difference. On Muslims, it was a religious obligation to pay Zakah; non-Muslims obviously didn’t have that so it was a state obligation to pay those taxes. Muslims had to join the army, non-Muslims didn’t. Etc. Etc. Etc. 
To the average person, it doesn’t matter through which processes their ancestors became Muslim/Christian/Jewish/whatever. They have made an conscious choice to follow this religion and that is their prerogative. They are Muslim now. And no amount of ahistoric jumbled-together anecdotes is going to change this. This is like those people arguing that Palestinians are actually Jews who were forced to convert to Islam so therefore they are actually Jews and should support the Jewish state of Israel (yes, people actually argue this)
Now notice the shift from ~ancient invasions~ to modern nation states. No differentiation. Muslims from 700 years ago and Muslims today are literally the same people no one died it’s all the same people the people who invaded Bangladesh are now in charge of Saudi Arabia not allowing women to drive. Islam becomes a monolith. Everyone, no matter at what time in history, at what point in the world, at what point in their spirituality, with what kinds of other identities is just part of “Izlam.” Everyone who ever was Muslim who is Muslim who ever will be Muslim is all the same they all live in this place called The Muslim World (TM) and only come here to bomb us. They, as a whole, also represent everything Islam wants and teaches, the way all Christians represent everything that Christianity wants and teaches. This seems to be the logic. Reductio ad absurdum that shit. Back to Saudi. None of y’all morons have any problem getting your gas from these petro-nations but the moment you need a talking point against Islam, Saudi Arabia becomes the epitome of Islam. Saudi Arabia also matched every dollar the CIA gave to the Mujahideen in Afghanistan to fight the Soviets (yes that’s a thing) and that war led to destruction in Afghanistan, too, but this person is not concerned about that because they don’t give a flying fuck about Afghanistan or Saudi Arabia, this is about their hate of Islam. 
Nobody cares about Saudi woman any other day of the year. Can you name a single Saudi activist without googling? Do you care about South Asian female workers in Saudi Arabia? None of these fools actually care about the ~plight~ of Muslim women, only tokenize it when convenient. Keep an eye out for this, it happens every fucking day. 
(Edit: I stand corrected, some minorities were converted in Afghanistan - within the last 2-3 centuries. Notice that the anon has no knowledge of this.) Today, Afghanistan has Hindu and Sikh minorities that have been living there for ages. When Afghan Jews left Afghanistan to move to Israel, Afghanistan was one of the very few nations to not strip them of their Afghan citizenship. This is not to say that minorities in our countries are not oppressed. They are. But notice this person cannot even list who those minorities are - what are their names? What are their identities? What are their stories? There are mass prosecutions happening in these places but this person isn’t even aware of them to mention them.
Minorities are disappearing everywhere. I don’t want to delve into this with examples from the United States because I don’t want to seem like I’m tokenizing other people’s struggles to prove a point. What I am getting at is this prosecution of minorities is in no way something that’s unique to Islam or a function of Islam. It’s happening everywhere. That’s a problem. A very big problem that we need to address. But as an argument against Islam, it doesn’t fly because its premise is wrong.  
Notice the entire argument here is “people were forced to convert to Islam therefore Islam is bad.” Despite being historically reductionist, this is logically unsound. Let’s say the premise in that argument (forced conversions) is true - that doesn’t mean the conclusions follow. You can be forced to do all kinds of things, that doesn’t mean the thing itself is bad, rather the fact that you were forced is bad. 
welp this turned out way longer than expected, I’ll leave the rest for another post. 

musaafer:

So as I mentioned, I’m profoundly bored with these messages but I figured some tips on how to dismantle this rhetoric may be helpful so here it goes 

First message: 

  • "Muslims invaded present day X and did Y" is a common talking point, possibly inspired by the white guilt that comes with the more recent and more lastingly affecting reality of colonialism. Yes. Empires did the thing where they spread. They continue to do so today (ahem, "US invaded present day Afghanistan and destroyed local places of worship, etc etc etc etc." is still true like, today). 
  • The world as we know it has been influenced heavily by the flows of these empires and conquest - is by that logic everything invalid? The Crusades were also a thing, is Christianity therefore invalid? 
  • Notice the places they are listing. 9 times out of 10 the person arguing this is not someone from those places but some random white dude from Kentucky. What I’m getting at is these people can barely locate these places on the map, let alone care about the sociopolitic histories and societal intricacies any other day of the year but when it comes to dismantling Islam, selective historic moments are handy to these people. Like, Afghanistan has been at far for 30+ years, Pakistan is at the brink of possibly falling into its fourth military dictatorship in its less than 70 years in existence and the spread of Islam 700 years ago is the problem? Get real. 
  • The term “natives” is incredibly derogatory and offensive and historically charged, akin to saying something like “colored people” instead of people of color. Deadass indicator the person isn’t about people’s actual experiences if they can’t even identifying them without falling over themselves with offensive language. 
  • Notice that I’m Afghan. And this person is not. Yet the conquest of my people - as a consequence of which I’m Muslim today, the consequences of which I am living with - is somehow of more concern to this person than it is to me? Keep in mind power dynamics. Keep in mind how your experience will be made into just another talking point in a conversation entirely designed to invalidate your experience and existence. 
  • The ever returning talking point on taxes on non-Muslims: What in the Lord’s name do you think Muslims were paying? Nothing? Do you think these Empires could expand with only ~taxes on da non-muzlims~? Non-Muslims paid Jizyah, Muslims paid Zakah. Don’t get smart with me by googling the difference. On Muslims, it was a religious obligation to pay Zakah; non-Muslims obviously didn’t have that so it was a state obligation to pay those taxes. Muslims had to join the army, non-Muslims didn’t. Etc. Etc. Etc. 
  • To the average person, it doesn’t matter through which processes their ancestors became Muslim/Christian/Jewish/whatever. They have made an conscious choice to follow this religion and that is their prerogative. They are Muslim now. And no amount of ahistoric jumbled-together anecdotes is going to change this. This is like those people arguing that Palestinians are actually Jews who were forced to convert to Islam so therefore they are actually Jews and should support the Jewish state of Israel (yes, people actually argue this)
  • Now notice the shift from ~ancient invasions~ to modern nation states. No differentiation. Muslims from 700 years ago and Muslims today are literally the same people no one died it’s all the same people the people who invaded Bangladesh are now in charge of Saudi Arabia not allowing women to drive. 

    Islam becomes a monolith. Everyone, no matter at what time in history, at what point in the world, at what point in their spirituality, with what kinds of other identities is just part of “Izlam.” Everyone who ever was Muslim who is Muslim who ever will be Muslim is all the same they all live in this place called The Muslim World (TM) and only come here to bomb us. They, as a whole, also represent everything Islam wants and teaches, the way all Christians represent everything that Christianity wants and teaches. This seems to be the logic. Reductio ad absurdum that shit. 

    Back to Saudi. None of y’all morons have any problem getting your gas from these petro-nations but the moment you need a talking point against Islam, Saudi Arabia becomes the epitome of Islam. Saudi Arabia also matched every dollar the CIA gave to the Mujahideen in Afghanistan to fight the Soviets (yes that’s a thing) and that war led to destruction in Afghanistan, too, but this person is not concerned about that because they don’t give a flying fuck about Afghanistan or Saudi Arabia, this is about their hate of Islam. 
  • Nobody cares about Saudi woman any other day of the year. Can you name a single Saudi activist without googling? Do you care about South Asian female workers in Saudi Arabia? None of these fools actually care about the ~plight~ of Muslim women, only tokenize it when convenient. Keep an eye out for this, it happens every fucking day. 
  • (Edit: I stand corrected, some minorities were converted in Afghanistan - within the last 2-3 centuries. Notice that the anon has no knowledge of this.) Today, Afghanistan has Hindu and Sikh minorities that have been living there for ages. When Afghan Jews left Afghanistan to move to Israel, Afghanistan was one of the very few nations to not strip them of their Afghan citizenship. This is not to say that minorities in our countries are not oppressed. They are. But notice this person cannot even list who those minorities are - what are their names? What are their identities? What are their stories? There are mass prosecutions happening in these places but this person isn’t even aware of them to mention them.
  • Minorities are disappearing everywhere. I don’t want to delve into this with examples from the United States because I don’t want to seem like I’m tokenizing other people’s struggles to prove a point. What I am getting at is this prosecution of minorities is in no way something that’s unique to Islam or a function of Islam. It’s happening everywhere. That’s a problem. A very big problem that we need to address. But as an argument against Islam, it doesn’t fly because its premise is wrong.  
  • Notice the entire argument here is “people were forced to convert to Islam therefore Islam is bad.” Despite being historically reductionist, this is logically unsound. Let’s say the premise in that argument (forced conversions) is true - that doesn’t mean the conclusions follow. You can be forced to do all kinds of things, that doesn’t mean the thing itself is bad, rather the fact that you were forced is bad. 

welp this turned out way longer than expected, I’ll leave the rest for another post. 

(via arabswagger)

http://arabswagger.tumblr.com/post/95854938525/churayl-a-few-days-ago-i-moved-into-college

churayl:

A few days ago, I moved into college. I’m starting a new chapter in my life and finally studying what I’m passionate about. At an event for student organizations, I witnessed an incident. It started with a Zionist student confronting the table representing Students for Justice in…

humansofnewyork:

"Tell me about the day you decided to leave Syria.""Our house was next to a checkpoint for the government, so we thought it was safe. There were snipers around, but we thought they knew us. They’d seen us everyday. But one day the electricity got very weak. The television was still working, but the refrigerator and washing machine cut off, so my brother went into the yard to check it. And then we heard a scream. It wasn’t exactly a scream, more like an ‘Ahhhh!’ And I ran outside. And there he was.""What is your fondest memory of your brother?""When we built a second story for our house, my brother and I spent the whole day working together. We were playing tricks on people. We were putting salt in their tea. We were hiding instead of working. We were laughing the entire day.""What were you thinking when you found him in the yard?"“‘How can I save him?’ How can I save him?’ How can I save him? How can I save him? How can I save him?’”"What did your mother say?""She didn’t say a thing. The whole family was screaming. But she didn’t make a sound." (Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan)

humansofnewyork:

"Tell me about the day you decided to leave Syria."
"Our house was next to a checkpoint for the government, so we thought it was safe. There were snipers around, but we thought they knew us. They’d seen us everyday. But one day the electricity got very weak. The television was still working, but the refrigerator and washing machine cut off, so my brother went into the yard to check it. And then we heard a scream. It wasn’t exactly a scream, more like an ‘Ahhhh!’ And I ran outside. And there he was."
"What is your fondest memory of your brother?"
"When we built a second story for our house, my brother and I spent the whole day working together. We were playing tricks on people. We were putting salt in their tea. We were hiding instead of working. We were laughing the entire day."
"What were you thinking when you found him in the yard?"
“‘How can I save him?’ How can I save him?’ How can I save him? How can I save him? How can I save him?’”
"What did your mother say?"
"She didn’t say a thing. The whole family was screaming. But she didn’t make a sound." 
(Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan)

r0s3m4ry:

quietlynonlinear:

When The Old Gods Return.

i thought these were real pictures at first

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

bleedforyourtypewriter:

Ok here is a compilation of all the software and useful tools I’ve come across whilst writing. Some of them I’ve reviewed on here already, more coming soon. 

Got an idea? Well get planning! Here’s some useful outlining, brainstorming and mind- mapping software:
Coggle 
Lucidchart
Mural.ly
Blumind
MindMeister
Mindmaple
Mindomo
NovaMind
Popplet
Scapple
Tree Sheets
Visual Understanding Environment (VUE)
XMind
FreeMind
Oak Outliner
Work Flowy
The Outliner of Giants
Just want to get writing? You want a word processor:
Gedit
Google Docs
Kate
LibreOffice
Microsoft Word
My Writing Spot
NoteTab
Open Office
Quabel
Ted
Vim
yEdit
Making notes? Here you go:
CintaNotes
Evernote
KeepNote
Memonic
MS OneNote
Scribe
SuperNotecard
Tomboy
Timelines giving you a headache? Try these:
Aeon Timeline 
Dipity
Preceden
Tiki-Toki
Timeglider
Timeline
TimelineJS
TimeToast
Now perhaps you want to organise those notes. Got a lot of research? Character sheets? Images? Well here’s some tools to keep all that together:
Liquid Story Binder XE
LitLift
PangurPad
Scriptito
Scrivener
Writer’s Café
Yarny
yWriter
Are you easily distracted? The following tools will keep you on track:
Dark Room 
FocusWriter
JDarkRoom
Momentum Writer
OmmWriter
Q10
Writemonkey
Zen Writer 
Even more productivity tools to help keep you focussed on your task:
Cold Turkey 
FocalFilter
Freedom
InternetOff
Keepmeout
Nanny
Productivity Owl
RescueTime
SelfControl
SelfRestraint
Simple Blocker
StayFocusd
Strict Workflow
Time Doctor
Waste No Time
Website Blocker
So you’ve got something down? Need to edit? 
AutoCrit
EditMinion
Grammarly
LyX
SlickWrite
SmartEdit
After the Deadline
All done? Perhaps you’d like some e-publishing tools:
Acrobat
InDesign
Calibre
CutePDF
Jutoh
Mobipocket Creator
PagePlus
PageStream
PDFCreator
Scribus
Sigil
I’m feeling generous, have some more cool stuff:
750 Words
One Page per Day
Oneword
Penzu
Write or Die
Written Kitten
Focus Booster
Spaaze
AutoREALM (Map building software)

Enjoy! I may update the list as I find more, or I’ll make a second list.

bleedforyourtypewriter:

Ok here is a compilation of all the software and useful tools I’ve come across whilst writing. Some of them I’ve reviewed on here already, more coming soon. 

Got an idea? Well get planning! Here’s some useful outlining, brainstorming and mind- mapping software:

Just want to get writing? You want a word processor:

Making notes? Here you go:

Timelines giving you a headache? Try these:

Now perhaps you want to organise those notes. Got a lot of research? Character sheets? Images? Well here’s some tools to keep all that together:

Are you easily distracted? The following tools will keep you on track:

Even more productivity tools to help keep you focussed on your task:

So you’ve got something down? Need to edit? 

All done? Perhaps you’d like some e-publishing tools:

I’m feeling generous, have some more cool stuff:

Enjoy! I may update the list as I find more, or I’ll make a second list.

(via characterandwritinghelp)

Egypt does not have a "sexual harassment epidemic"

noor3amoor:

In light of seven men finally being sentenced to life in prison for sexual assault in Tahrir Square, I want to tear my hair out every single time I read Western AND Egyptian media outlets describe sexual harassment in Egypt as “epidemic” or “endemic”. I could write a…

dynamicafrica:

The Year Algeria Made Football & World Cup History.

It’s been 32 years since the Algerian national football team caused what some have named one of the ‘biggest upsets' in World Cup history by defeating then European champions West Germany. It's also been 32 years since Algeria was sabotaged in what The Guardian calls “one of sport’s most blatant cases of match-fixing.”

Qualifying for the first time ever, Algeria’s presence at the World Cup hosted in Spain that year was already an historic feat. The African team had been placed in a group that included Austria, Chile, and West Germany who they were scheduled to play against first.

On that June day in 1982, the North African novices faced reigning European champions West Germany. Many predicted a thrashing by the Germans who in turn didn’t shy away from making boastful statements about the game that lay ahead. One German player boldly declared before the match, “we will dedicate our seventh goal to our wives, and the eighth to our dogs”, openly mocking their Algerian opponents. Even the then West German manager, Jupp Derwall, reportedly said that if the Algerians won, he would “jump on the first train back to Munich.” Algeria defender Chaabane Merzekane recalled that one of the West German players said that he would play the match with a cigar in his mouth.

Well, if Derwall had any sense of foresight, he would’ve booked a one-way ticket back to Munich immediately. Better yet, if Derwall had only done his homework on the Algerian team, he may have refrained from making such a statement. Negligence on Derwall’s part would later mean that West Germany would be in for a great surprise. It was only after the match that Derwall admitted that he was given a footage of the Algerian players in action, as is customary, but did not show it to his team as they would have mocked him had he done so. Why? Simply because the Germans, whether out of racism or ignorance, did not think the Algerians to be worthy opponents.

In 1982, most of Algeria’s national football team was comprised of players who had been teammates for years as Algerian law at the time prohibited players from leaving the country before the age of 28, something that stemmed from the FLN’s role in Algeria’s history of independence and its influence on the country’s football team. All of the players had been based at home, as a result of this law, making their bond of the field exceptionally strong and fluid. Several former FLN players were part of the coaching staff in 1982, including Abdelhamid Zouba and the co-manager Rachid Mekloufi, and the spirit of Algerian pride that had been established by these players who left France to play for Algeria was present in the team. 1982 was also the 20th anniversary of Algeria’s independence. 

Algeria had successfully beaten Nigeria to be present at the 1982 World Cup and during their first ever match at this tournament, the determination and humility of the Fennec Foxes, as well as their skill, of course, would see them through to a 2-1 victory against West Germany. This victory made Algeria the first African team to defeat a European opponent at the World Cup. Their next match against Austria saw the tides turn as they lost 2-0, but against Chile, they regained their form and won that match leaving them with four points from their three games (back when it was two points for a win).

Now, their fate of progressing became dependent on West Germany failing to beat Austria the next day. But both the Germans and Austrians both knew that if Germany beat Austria 1-0, it would result in both teams progressing to the next round at Algeria’s expense. Thus, both teams conspired to achieve this result - a distasteful case of match-fixing that forever changed the world of football. After Germany’s Horst Hrubesch put his team in the lead at the 10th minute, both the Germans and Austrians basically did nothing for the next 80 minutes. No attempts at goal, just an hour and 20 minutes of kicking the ball around.

As The Guardian points out, “the game was no longer a contest, it was a conspiracy.”

Both the Austrian and West German teams were scorned by the public. Algerian fans in the crowd burned peseta notes to show their suspicions of corruption. Spaniards in attendance waved hankerchiefs throughout the second half in a traditional display of disdain. The following day, Spanish newspapers denounced the actions of both teams and there was outrage in West Germany and Austria too.

German commentator Eberhard Stanjek, working for German channel ARD, almost sobbed during the match and said: “What is happening here is disgraceful and has nothing to do with football. You can say what you like, but not every end justifies the means.” His fellow Austrian commentator suggested viewers turn off their TVs and he refused to speak for the last half-hour. Former West German international Willi Schulz branded the German players “gangsters”.

But these ‘gangsters’ remained unapologetic through the criticism, backlash and protesting. When German fans gathered at the team hotel to protest, the players responded by throwing water bombs at them from their balconies.

The head of the Austrian delegation, Hans Tschak, made this extraordinary racist comments about the Algerian team: “Naturally today’s game was played tactically. But if 10,000 ‘sons of the desert’ here in the stadium want to trigger a scandal because of this it just goes to show that they have too few schools. Some sheikh comes out of an oasis, is allowed to get a sniff of World Cup air after 300 years and thinks he’s entitled to open his gob.”

Not ones to stoop down to the level of their European opponents, the Fennec Foxes remained publicly unphased by these comments. As Merzekane recalls, “We weren’t angry, we were cool,” he says. “To see two big powers debasing themselves in order to eliminate us was a tribute to Algeria. They progressed with dishonour, we went out with our heads held high.”

All over the world, people called on FIFA to punish the Europeans or stage a replay, but in the end all that was done by them was to rule that from then onwards the last pair of games in every group would be played simultaneously. Algeria had come to the World Cup and made history in more ways than one. They had left an “indelible mark on football history.”

(sources: 1 | 2 | 3)

(via arabswagger)